Dads in the Limelight – Tom Briggs

Dads in the Limelight Series

Our 525th Dad in the Limelight is advocate of spiritual/physical/emotional health and wholeness and balance Tom Briggs. I want to thank Tom Briggs for being a part of this series. It has been great getting connected with Tom Briggs and now sharing him with all of you.

Tom-Briggs

1) Tell me about yourself, (as well as how you are in the limelight for my readers knowledge)

My name is Tom Briggs and I was born and raised in Oregon. I’m 33 and a big advocate of spiritual/physical/emotional health and wholeness and balance. In addition to being a dad, I’m a black belt, runner, outdoor enthusiast, scuba diver, fan of Jesus and travel/adventure-seeker.

For pay, I wrangle words at Caffelli, an integrated branding agency.

 

2) Tell me about your family
My wife and I have been married 8 years and have a 11-month old. My wife and I are both Oregon natives and supremely fortunate to both sets of grandparents close by. My mom passed away from cancer at age 54 and my dad remarried a woman 13 years younger with 5 kids, so we’re now a blended family thing, which has been a whole other learning experience.

 

Untitled-1

3) What has been the largest challenge you have had in being a father?
Dying to self. I always saw myself as the self-sacrificing type, but wiping a butt at 3 am, endless cleaning of breast pump parts and the whole “responsibility for keeping another human being alive” thing has disavowed me of this notion.

 

4) What advice would you give to other fathers?

  • Practice presence—for yourself, for other half and for your kids. I haven’t perfected this, but what progress I have made has paid BIG dividends.
  • Stay emotionally connected to your partner—avoid getting pulled into the “it’s all about the kids” vortex. We remind ourselves in 18 years we want to have some semblance of a relationship to come back to when the house is empty.
  • Exercise. New discoveries every day reveal how critical this is for body and mind.
  • Embrace the suck. I learned this principle from ex Navy seal Mark Devine, and it has served me well.
  • Supplement well. Good-quality B vitamins and multivitamin supplements will help keep energy up and are far more sustainable than caffeine.
  • Drink water.
  • Manage your spirituality—whatever this means for you. Attend Sunday services, meditate, get into nature. Whatever you do, tend the garden of the soul.
  • Get your genetic profile from 23 & Me (https://www.23andme.com). Genetics loads the gun, but behaviors pull the trigger. Knowing what you should and shouldn’t do can keep you on this earth and enjoying the grandkids longer. If your kids are old enough to spit in a test tube, run it for them too. Consider it a great lesson in genetics.

 

Tom-Briggs5) How have you come to balance parenthood and outside life? 
I haven’t. Working toward this balance. As the son of a workaholic, I know my strengths and weaknesses. Technology fasts seem to work wonders.

 

6) What have you learned from the fathers that you have interacted with?
My dad taught me plenty about fatherhood, both in his successes and struggles. A solo entrepreneur since I was 6, he poured plenty of time into his business during some formative years. Looking back, this showed me the distinction between physical presence and emotional presence. That said, before this, he was in sales and travelling 5 days out of 7, so entrepreneurship was probably the better option. Lesson I learned was that there will always be hard choices to make.

 

7) What else would you share regarding your experiences as a father thus far?
There’s nothing like this journey. I’ve seen my family grow so much over the past year. I’m a self-improvement/self-actualization geek, so this has been really enjoyable. Wouldn’t trade the experience for anything.

 

8) What have been the most memorable experiences that you have had thus far as a parent?
Seeing my firstborn son being pulled from my wife was really incredible. Our goal was a natural birth, but ended up with as an epidural and C-section. Seeing my angry, purple, wrinkled son being extracted from my wife was something that fundamentally changed me.

 

Thanks for the opportunity to share. Best of luck on your own fatherhood journeys. If you want to connect, you can find me at @pdxwrite.

 

If you have any questions for Tom Briggs, please leave a comment here and I will make sure that he gets them so that he may be able to respond!

Also, do you know a Dad in the Limelight? If so, please email me their contact information so that they too can be a part of this series!

Dad of Divas, dadofdivas.com

——————————————————————————————-
New to the Divadom?
Please Subscribe to my RSS Feed! Subscribe in a reader
Questions?Drop me a line at dadofdivas@gmail.com

Dads in the Limelight – Dean O’Loughlin of Life With The Tag Team Terrorists

Dads in the Limelight Series

Our 524th Dad in the Limelight is Dean O’Loughlin. I want to thank Dean O’Loughlin of Life With The Tag Team Terrorists for being a part of this series. It has been great getting connected with him and now sharing him with all of you.

 

Dean-O'Loughlin1) Tell me about yourself, (as well as how you are in the limelight for my readers knowledge)

I was born in 1964, 10 weeks after JFK was shot. Apparently the shock of the American President’s assassination gave my Mom quite a turn and she had to lie down for a couple of days for fear of losing me.  When I did arrive I was warmly received as the only boy in a brood of 5, at least I was by my Mother. My Dad on the other hand was probably too engrossed in Ironside to notice. I often refer to him as the man who put the ‘Pa’ into ‘apathy’. Maybe his indifference is what prompted me to be such an enthusiastic Father. Maybe he gave me something after all.

 

I decided early on that I wanted to be a singer. I was entertaining ladies in the local laundrette with Tom Jones covers at 4 years old and continued on a similar path right up until our first baby was born. During the years I had only a little success but a lot of pleasure from music.

 

I have a small construction and interior design business that has been more or less on hold these past few years. I was a late Dad, not successfully seed-sowing until I was 45. We hadn’t spent any real effort trying to get pregnant and we didn’t have a plan. We decided on a whim to stop using contraction and the stork showed up and kicked the door in pretty soon after.

 

I came third on the UK version of Big Brother 2 in 2001.

 

I write a blog called Life With The Tag Team Terrorists to save on psychiatry fees.

 

2) Tell me about your family.

My wife works for a big airline. Before the kids we used to jet around the world, stay in posh hotels, drink, laugh, see amazing things, meet amazing people….(can you tell I miss it?) She has always been the one with the proper job and the wise head as far as money is concerned so when it came to working out who would stay at home with the kids it was an easy decision.

 

Our daughter, or Kid 1 as she is affectionately known, was born in 2009. To say she’s high maintenance would be a ridiculous understatement. She is strong-willed, super smart, manipulative, funny and charming. We know it’s tough being her parents right now but we also know that ultimately we won’t worry when she finally leaves home and goes out into the world. I say we won’t worry, we may worry about the rest of the world but not about her. (That is patently untrue, but you get the idea.) Kid 2 is two and a half years her junior. He’s a lot more laid back. (which is not difficult) Once he has a car in one hand and something sweet and edible in the other he is content. We have noticed however that just before his third birthday testosterone seems to have showed up to share in the celebrations. He can’t punch enough things. Everything and everyone is a legitimate target it seems from cuddly toys to my thighs. We all forgive him as the rest of the time he is a sweetie. He comes up and hugs you and says I love you completely unprompted. He’s a real looker too so again we think he’ll be fine once he flies the coop. But hey, what do we know?

 

In short we are lucky as Hell to have two beautiful, healthy kids and we know it.

 

Dean-O'Loughlin

3) What has been the largest challenge you have had in being a father?

I had always imagined giving up music would be the toughest part about parenthood but in the end it was a cinch. I imagine that it came easy because I have spent so much of my adult life following that dream. I gave it a proper shot, unfettered by responsibility. It took centre stage for decades so when the time came to let go of it I found my grip loosened willingly.

 

As for what was the biggest challenge, I think the hardest thing has been living in a routine. I have always rallied against conformity and schedules so when I realised there was absolutely NO alternative for getting, and keeping your shit together, every single day of every single month it felt like being hit with wet leather. The school run, mealtimes, bedtimes, it just goes on and on without let up or alternative.

 

I may secretly despise this relentless cycle but whenever we go away on holiday or visiting and all the security of our finely tuned routine is missing I realise how vital it is to my sanity. It somehow feels like starting from scratch again. Now, after finding it so difficult to gear my life around times and sequence and patterns of behaviour, I must confess to embracing our routines like well-worn, sturdy crutches.

 

4) What advice would you give to other fathers?

The advice I’d give to other Dads is simple: Give in to It and Get into It. The only times I’ve found parenthood unbearable is when I have been trying to do something else while trying to be a Dad at the same time. Trying to watch football while watching the kids, or have a beer, or a telephone conversation or a holiday or a different life. Accept your fate and commit to it. Embrace it. You have to make separate time for yourself instead of nibbling into the time you should be spending being a proper Dad. Time for yourself is going to be a fraction of what it was before but you’ll be surprised how sweet that can make it. Oh, and you might find it best to hang out with other Dads so that you don’t make your non-Dad friends HATE YOU. There is nothing more boring than talking about some else’s kid’s when you don’t have any, and talk about them you will.

 

Conversely you’ll find that a good old moan about your beloved offspring with another Dad is like magical medicine.

 

Dean-O'Loughlin

5) How have you come to balance parenthood and outside life?

Did I answer that in the previous question? Am I jumping the gun? Maybe. Like I say it’s all about making time for yourself. That way, when you return to the role of Dad, you can give it your all. I play football for an hour a week, every week, without fail. I think I may have gone insane without it by now. You need to escape, and regularly, to refresh and reboot.  I don’t know what it’s like being a Dad who works and sees his kids in the evenings and weekends but I wouldn’t exchange the opportunity  I’ve had to share this part of my kid’s lives for anything.  Even with all the madness.

 

6) What have you learned from the fathers that you have interacted with?

What I’ve learnt from other Dad’s is that we’re all going through the same highs and lows. The experience of Fatherhood seems to have a few common themes. I know that I still have something way down inside inside telling me to run, be free, get out there, succeed, conquer, explore. You can see it for what it is ; instinct, genetics, a throw back to a time when the chimp in all of us was calling the shots. (Think 2001 : A Space Odyssey pre-monolith sequence.)  This may be contentious but I don’t know that men are endowed with the right amounts of patience or compassion you need to make being a stay at home parent easy. That’s a generalisation I know but that’s my perception of it and it’s shared by a lot of my mates. Don’t get me wrong I know that being a stay at home Dad is completely do-able, and with great success, I just think it takes more application, more conscious thinking, more white boards, more lists. I treat my own Project Dad the same way I would any other supremely complicated, all consuming project I might be have been asked to do, like organising Glastonbury or planning the allied invasion of Normandy.

 

Dean-O'Loughlin7) What else would you share regarding your experiences as a father thus far?

It’s a huge ask to try and sum up the last 5 years of parenthood but if I had to the opening line of A Tale Of Two Cities comes close :

 

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way. . . .

 

That is all. I’m not going to try and polish Dickens.

 

8) What have been the most memorable experiences that you have had thus far as a parent?

We had a tricky couple of births with our two which I guess will always be the most memorable times for one reason or another but there was a real joy the day after I became a Dad for the first time. An hour after Kid 1 was born I walked into a shop to buy my wife some flowers and beamed at the florist behind the counter like a valium soaked imbecile and said We just had a baby in a gormless, detached way. I floated around for the next 24 hours on a real natural high. It felt great. There were a few hiccups, like emptying a birthing pool but on the whole it was a unique lovely day.

 

The best thing about being a parent is that you get drip fed little bits of loveliness here and there, when you least expect them. Every night I go in and check on the kids as they sleep. They are so perfect and peaceful and innocent and beautiful it makes my heart soar every time. There is nothing I have experienced in my lifetime that comes close.

Our Thanks to Dean O’Loughlin for taking the time to provide the Dad of Divas audience this interview.

If you have any questions for Dean OLoughlin, please leave a comment here and I will make sure that he gets them so that he may be able to respond!

Also, do you know a Dad in the Limelight? If so, please email me their contact information so that they too can be a part of this series!

Dad of Divas, dadofdivas.com

——————————————————————————————-
New to the Divadom?
Please Subscribe to my RSS Feed! Subscribe in a reader
Questions?Drop me a line at dadofdivas@gmail.com

Dads in the Limelight ( #limelightdads ) – Justin Meyer ( @dadontheloose ) #DadSpotlight

Dads in the Limelight Series

Our 523rd Dad in the Limelight is Justin Meyer. I want to thank Justin Meyer from Dad on the Loose for being a part of this series. It has been great getting connected with him and now sharing him with all of you.

Justin-Dad-on-the-loose

1) Tell me about yourself, (as well as how you are in the limelight for my readers knowledge)

My name is Justin. I’m a father, a writer, and an attorney living on Long Island, NY. In my spare time, I read, listen to music, and cheer for the Islanders, Jets, and Mets. Lately, I have been addicted to Temple Run 2, for which I blame my daughter and niece.
I kind of thrust myself into the limelight, because I decided to start a dad-blog – http://www.dadontheloose.com – and twitter feed (@dadontheloose) as a place for me to write a lot of the stories that my own family didn’t care to hear me tell (since they’d all been there). It’s a way for me to write more light-hearted things, and have some fun.
2) Tell me about your family
I am married, and have two children – 5 years, and 2.5 months. Our niece lives with us as well; she’s 15.
3) What has been the largest challenge you have had in being a father?
Getting through law school (while working nights), and passing the bar, with an infant/toddler and a wife who has to travel for work. Even though she would take our daughter with her a lot of the time, I had to be very flexible and manage schedules. We also had to find day care that was flexible and willing to work with us.
 Justin-Dad-on-the-loose
4) What advice would you give to other fathers?
Talk to your children. My daughter and I used to share a 30 minute commute to school & work, and we would talk about all sorts of things – from the planets, to staying health. We would play games, sing songs, and listen to music. Because my daughter also shares my sense of humor, we share jokes. Being able to talk to her now means, I hope, that she’ll feel that she can talk to me later.
5) How have you come to balance parenthood and outside life? 
I’m not sure that I have. Because of my work schedule, sometimes I work late at night, and miss bedtime. I call home when I know it’s going to be a late night, and say hi. We just moved, so I live closer to the office now; I can pop home if I want/need to. I also try to make sure that I have some time free on the weekends, and a couple of nights a week. Dinner is important to me – that’s time to sit down and catch up.
Justin-Dad-on-the-loose
6) What have you learned from the fathers that you have interacted with?
Well, I work with my father, so I have learned a lot from him. He’s taught me a lot about passing knowledge on to the next generation, and how to be a father.
7) What else would you share regarding your experiences as a father thus far?
Never discount your child’s interest in just spending time with you. My daughter will sit and watch me write, sometimes. If I am doing chores around the house, I make her my helper and she happily hands me tools and parts. She loves to help out, learn, and be included. It’s important to make sure you do that. It’s also important that every child feels special. I make sure that I am finding time to do things with my niece – just the two of us. It gives us time to connect, and do things that she’s interested in.
 Justin-Dad-on-the-loose
8) What have been the most memorable experiences that you have had thus far as a parent?
This is a tough one. I’ve had so many wonderful moments. From recent memory, I would pick watching my daughter meet her new brother, sitting in the hospital and holding him. But I still remember my daughter’s first steps in our old kitchen. My daughter was about 2 when I took the Florida bar, and my wife had to leave for work, so the day after the test was over, it was just my daughter and me in downtown Tampa. We went out for tapas to celebrate me being finished. She sat in her seat with a menu and we discussed what we would order. I remember getting some amused looks from passers-by. Of course, I still get a thrill just from listening to her read to me, so I’m pretty easy in that regard.

If you have any questions for Justin, please leave a comment here and I will make sure that he gets them so that he may be able to respond!

Also, do you know a Dad in the Limelight? If so, please email me their contact information so that they too can be a part of this series!

Dad of Divas, dadofdivas.com

——————————————————————————————-
New to the Divadom?
Please Subscribe to my RSS Feed! Subscribe in a reader
Questions?Drop me a line at dadofdivas@gmail.com

Dads in the Limelight ( #limelightdads ) – Nathan Clayton ( @FunDadBlog ) #DadSpotlight

Dads in the Limelight Series

Our 522nd Dad in the Limelight is Nathan Clayton. I want to thank Nathan for being a part of this series. It has been great getting connected with him and now sharing him with all of you.

 

Nathan-Deleon1) Tell me about yourself, (as well as how you are in the limelight for my readers knowledge)

For starters, my name is Nathan and I’m a proud father of 3 beautiful girls. Now, I was born with Tricuspid Atresia and due to health issues have recently become a stay at home dad. I never knew how boring it can be just sitting around while everyone is either at work or at school. After about a month of pure boredom I decided to create a blog about how I like to spend time with my children. FunDadBlog.com has been my creative outlet for the last month or so and I’m amazed at all the support I’ve been receiving. I like to show that being “Dad” is the most fun I’ve ever had.
Nathan-Deleon
2) Tell me about your family
I have 4 amazing ladies in my home. Elizabeth, my wife, is the strongest woman I’ve ever known. She has taken on the responsibilities of being the bread winner without complaining that I can no longer work. She’s also the brains behind the blog. I couldn’t do anything without her support.
Aubrey, 8, is wise beyond her years. She understands things that I’m still learning about and it’s truly amazing. She is a very gifted little girl.
Hayden, 6, is our little comedian. I have so many funny stories about this girl, it’s hard to describe her in a few sentences. She’s crazy, funny, and just a little bit evil. :D
Sophia, 4, is our little princess. This is the cuddliest person in the world. She just loves on you and makes you want to hold her for hours. Her nickname is Sopapilla because she is so sweet and fluffy.
Nathan-Deleon
3) What has been the largest challenge you have had in being a father?
The hardest thing I deal with on a daily basis is discipline. I love having fun with my kids and enjoy the play time we have. When I have to put my foot down and get them to do their homework or take a nap, that’s hard. They know I like to have fun and try to push that. We’ve got a pretty good balance going now and I think it’s working pretty well.
4) What advice would you give to other fathers?
I heard somewhere that 90% of being a Dad is just being there. That is the most insightful piece of advice that I’ve ever read. If you can just take the time out of your day and spend it with your kids… you’ll be golden. Getting that extra 10% is where the fun kicks in. Just be there when they need you and they’ll return the favor.
Nathan-Deleon
5) How have you come to balance parenthood and outside life? 
When you’re a parent, there is no “outside life”. My wife and I have always had at least one night a month to go out and be adults. Most of the time we end up just talking about the kids. I’m not saying that once you’re a parent everything is all about your kids. You just realize you’re so attached to them that being away is harder than you expect. The biggest obstacle is putting your children aside so you have that time with just Mommy. It really doesn’t even matter what you do, it’s unhealthy to never get that alone time as a couple.
Nathan-Deleon
6) What have you learned from the fathers that you have interacted with?
I haven’t really interacted with any fathers my age, I started to early I guess. Everything that I’ve learned as a father, I learned from my Dad. He worked long hours as a police officer but always found the time to play GoldenEye or watch some football with me. I remember him riding his motorcycle nearly 400 miles round trip in the rain while I was in the hospital just because I forgot a stuffed animal. That’s the only influence I’ve ever needed.
Nathan-Deleon
7) What else would you share regarding your experiences as a father thus far?
If you’re a new dad or an expecting dad. Take the time to enjoy every moment. Being a father is the most exciting thing in the world. I never liked children until I had one of my own. It’s crazy how much they can change your lives if you let them. LET THEM. You won’t regret it.
Nathan-Deleon
8) What have been the most memorable experiences that you have had thus far as a parent?
It’s the little things in life that make me tick. Helping the girls with homework, watching them grow. It’s all just so memorable. The day they were born was cool and all but the memories we’ve made in this short time are way more special. I’m just trying not to miss a beat.

Nathan-Deleon
If you have any questions for Nathan, please leave a comment here and I will make sure that he gets them so that he may be able to respond!

Also, do you know a Dad in the Limelight? If so, please email me their contact information so that they too can be a part of this series!

Dad of Divas, dadofdivas.com

——————————————————————————————-
New to the Divadom?
Please Subscribe to my RSS Feed! Subscribe in a reader
Questions?Drop me a line at dadofdivas@gmail.com

Night At The Museum: Secret Of The Tomb – Family Movie Night! @MuseumMovies

night-at-the-museum

To celebrate the release of Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment’s NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM: SECRET OF THE TOMB on Blu-ray, DVD and Digital HD,  think about hosting a Family Movie Night this weekend! To make the night even more fun-filled we have created activity sheets, discussion guides, and games all available at  http://www.nightatthemuseummovie.com

About the Movie

In NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM: SECRET OF THE TOMB, Ben Stiller leads an all-star comedy cast, including Robin Williams, Owen Wilson, Rebel Wilson and Ricky Gervais, for one final, fun-filled Night at the Museum. This time, Larry Daley (Stiller) and his heroic friends embark on their greatest adventure yet as they travel to London in order to save the magic that brings the museum exhibits to life!

Dads in the Limelight ( #limelightdads ) – Jim Joseph ( @OutAndAboutDad ) #dadchat

Dads in the Limelight Series

Our 521st Dad in the Limelight is Jim Joseph. I want to thank Jim for being a part of this series. It has been great getting connected with him and now sharing him with all of you.

 

Jim-Joseph1) Tell me about yourself, (as well as how you are in the limelight for my readers knowledge)

Jim Joseph here, aka @OutAndAboutDad, aka @JimJosephExp.  While my work as a marketer, professor, blogger, and three-time author has put me in the limelight, it’s my role as Dad that has brought me the greatest reward.

 

2) Tell me about your family

I am a somewhat new empty nester with a daughter (21) and a son (19) who are both in college.  My partner and I have been together for over fifteen years.   The kids are starting their own journeys as we open a new chapter in ours.  Along the way we added a French Bulldog named Sophie to our family.  She brought us so much joy through the years, especially when the kids were growing up.  I couldn’t be prouder of all my kids!

 

3) What has been the largest challenge you have had in being a father?

I was a full-time Dad, divorced Dad, single Dad, and gay Dad back at a time when it wasn’t cool or accepted to be any of the above.  There were no support groups, no hashtags, no Daddy Bloggers, and in fact there were no role models of any kind.  I felt out there on my own, raising my kids before Dads were ever in the limelight.  I’m actually writing a book about it now, which will be out in Spring 2015 … just in time for Father’s Day!

 

Jim-Joseph

4) What advice would you give to other fathers?

Just live in the moment and relish every stage because the childhood years rush by in a flash.  Oh, and save for college, if your children as so inclined.  The best is yet to come … adult children are an amazing part of life.

 

5) How have you come to balance parenthood and outside life? 

It’s been a journey for sure, and I don’t think there’s any such thing as finding a balance.  I’ve had to make hard choices throughout my life as priorities have evolved while the kids have grown and while I’ve managed my career.  I wouldn’t say it’s a balancing act, I’d say it’s a game of shuffling responsibilities as time management and priorities change through the years.

 

 

6) What have you learned from the fathers that you have interacted with?

Paternal instincts are just as strong and just as deep as maternal ones.  Loving and taking care of a child is the same no matter where it comes from.

Jim-Joseph

7) What else would you share regarding your experiences as a father thus far?

I’ve learned to not take it all so seriously and to laugh even at the toughest points.   “This too shall pass,” both in good times and bad.

 

8) What have been the most memorable experiences that you have had thus far as a parent?

My proudest moment was moving my kids into college.  It’s the moment I’d been working toward, and when I finally got there it felt just as good as I’d imagined.  Probably better.  No other feeling like it in the world.  Their success is a far greater achievement than anything I will ever do in my life.

 

If you have any questions for Jim, please leave a comment here and I will make sure that he gets them so that he may be able to respond!

Also, do you know a Dad in the Limelight? If so, please email me their contact information so that they too can be a part of this series!

Dad of Divas, dadofdivas.com

——————————————————————————————-
New to the Divadom?
Please Subscribe to my RSS Feed! Subscribe in a reader
Questions?Drop me a line at dadofdivas@gmail.com

Dads in the Limelight ( #limelightdads ) – Andy Holloman ( @AndyHolloman ) #dadchat

Dads in the Limelight Series

Our 520th Dad in the Limelight is Andy Holloman. I want to thank Andy for being a part of this series. It has been great getting connected with him and now sharing him with all of you.

Andy-Holloman

1) Tell me about yourself, (as well as how you are in the limelight for my readers knowledge)
50 yr old Dad of three  (16 yo girl,  boys age 14, 11)   Happily married for 21 yrs to psychologist Dr. Margot Holloman.  Love being a dad and I am so proud of my children and the adults they are becoming.    Have been living in the Raleigh/Durham NC area since graduating from UNC-Chapel Hill in 1986 with a Bachelor’s Degree in Economics.
I am an Amazon BestSelling Fiction writer as a hobby with two novels published.  Genre –  Men’s adventure  (or, as my wife sees it, the men in my stories are  “Men Behaving Badly)    Starting writing in 2003 and first novel published in 2011  (Title – Shades of Gray) and had a second When His Dreams Take Flight (2013).   Truly enjoy the story crafting process.
For work, I’m in the Real Estate Industry (mortgage lending) and occasionally buy/ repair / and resale single family homes.
Avid Tennis player.  Love the Beaches and Mountains here in North Carolina.
2) Tell me about your family
I’m quite lucky to have 3 healthy, happy children and a wife who still tolerates all my shortcomings even after being married for 21 years.  Our family enjoys doing things together like camping, playing soccer, tennis, and watching films.  My wife and I especially enjoy documentaries.  My oldest is my only daughter and  she is a big soccer player as well as our social butterfly.  She is a Junior in High School and has recently started driving.  My second is my superstar scientist wanna be who’s in eighth grade.  Video games are his life and he loves to talk about BIG topics like science, religion, God, world politics, films, and computers.  My third child is the actor of the family, constantly entertaining and wowing us with his dramatic flair (especially when it comes to comedy).  He is a fifth grader and dreading the move to middle school.  His preference is to stay young and light-hearted.  Oh how I so wish he could.
 Andy-Holloman
3) What has been the largest challenge you have had in being a father?
Learning to be patient.  I struggle with wanting immediate results and rarely does a father have the chance to witness quick results in their children.  Their time under my care is so brief and so important that I worry about how they will turn out rather than enjoying the ride.  Fortunately, my wife is quite knowledgeable and well-read regarding all things “parenting” so I blessed to have her by my side.  Being the Dad in any family is akin to herding cats and one must always anticipate that things never turn out the way you expect them to.  I struggle (still) on how to deal with the unexpected.
4) What advice would you give to other fathers?
Trust your instincts as you help your children grow into adults.  Listen carefully to what they are saying AND doing.  Show them with your actions that you are there for them now and for always.  Provide them with the security to know that you will always be there for them AND be willing to let them fumble around and make mistakes.  Young people HAVE to know that mistakes are normal and that overcoming them is the answer.  Their brief time on this earth (thus far) just doesn’t allow them to understand that hard times will pass.  What they are facing in the way of difficulties today will not last forever.
5) How have you come to balance parenthood and outside life? 
I rarely had an outside life when my children were smaller.  All of our activities revolved around the family and just keeping things together.  Socially, we spent time with the parents of my childrens’ friends, which is fine, but it is important to have activities and social connections outside of the family.  I wish that I had pursued more hobbies outside the family (as well as played more tennis!) .
Now that my children are older, I can see the future ahead where they will have their own lives and not be dependent on my for daily guidance.  So I am doing better with expanding my social connections (and playing more tennis!).  My wife is doing the same by expanding some volunteer efforts that she has always wanted to do as well as growing her private psychology practice in a new and exciting direction.
Andy-Holloman
6) What have you learned from the fathers that you have interacted with?
How important it is to be gentle and kind.  I was quite fortunate to have participated in the YMCA Guides/Princess Program here in the Raleigh/Durham area (the largest in the nation) and this organization was founded to help Dads do more with their children.  It also exposed me to dozens of other Dads that I got to know very well.  They taught me the importance of patience and kindness and the truly the only gift that we as Dads MUST give to our children is our UNDIVIDED ATTENTION.
7) What else would you share regarding your experiences as a father thus far?
It all goes by so very, very quickly.  Be engaged, even when you’re struggling with work issues, financial matters, spousal disagreements, etc.  The one thing that no father should have to experience is a life time of regret that they weren’t truly present for their children.
8) What have been the most memorable experiences that you have had thus far as a parent?
As I mentioned above, being a part of the YMCA program for Dad’s and their kids has given me dozens of memorable experiences with all three of my children.  It is a strong bond between myself and all three of them.  Outings with this group were always conducted with the sole focus being on the children and thus these experiences stay with me always as some of the very best times that I have had with my kids.

If you have any questions for Andy, please leave a comment here and I will make sure that he gets them so that he may be able to respond!

Also, do you know a Dad in the Limelight? If so, please email me their contact information so that they too can be a part of this series!

Dad of Divas, dadofdivas.com

——————————————————————————————-
New to the Divadom?
Please Subscribe to my RSS Feed! Subscribe in a reader
Questions?Drop me a line at dadofdivas@gmail.com

Dads in the Limelight ( #limelightdads ) – Duncan Browne ( @yellowbellydad ) #dadchat

Dads in the Limelight Series

Our 519th Dad in the Limelight is Duncan Browne. I want to thank Duncan for being a part of this series. It has been great getting connected with him and now sharing him with all of you.

Duncan-Browne

1) Tell me about yourself, (as well as how you are in the limelight for my readers knowledge)
My name is Duncan Browne. I am a 34-year-old sports writer in Boston, Lincolnshire – a quiet, flat but beautiful outpost in the east of England. I am currently learning parenthood on the job, a frantic, tiring and brilliantly rewarding role which I document on my blog (https://yellowbellydad.wordpress.com/) and elsewhere on social media.
2) Tell me about your family
I live with my fiancee Laura, our newborn daughter Caitlin and our two cats. Even the felines are female, which means I’m totally outnumbered in my home and far too many things are pink, frilly and totally devoid of masculinity (except the sofas, which have just been ripped to shreds by the cats).
Duncan-Browne
3) What has been the largest challenge you have had in being a father?
With Caitlin only a matter of weeks old, it would be wrong to to blow things out of proportion here. I’m yet to witness my daughter suffer illness, setbacks or her first broken heart. Right now, apart from a bit of colic and some overflowing nappies, I’m just enjoying time with my daughter. However, Caitlin’s birth was very traumatic and, at times, touch-and-go. It was hard being a spectator and totally unable to do anything to help. I guess I’m just blessed to have two very tough girls in my life.
4) What advice would you give to other fathers?
The same advice I’d give to anybody in life – always look for the positives. Life throws curve balls at you at every opportunity, and unless your existence is brought to a standstill by an epic tragedy, it’s always better to think the glass is half full. As a parent you’re always going to get baby vomit on your best shirt before an important meeting or have to cancel plans to meet up with friends. You’ll love life a lot more if you can just laugh at yourself and move on.
Duncan-Browne
5) How have you come to balance parenthood and outside life? 
I’m extremely fortunate that my day job is sports writing. If I was to tell Laura that I was abandoning her and Caitlin to spend mySaturday driving half way across the country to watch a soccer match then I’m pretty sure I wouldn’t make it out the house without the rolling pin stuck in my head. Fortunately, when it’s work you get a free pass. Making a living out of your hobbies and interests helps me with that balance as I have spare time to spend with my family without feeling I’m missing out in life.
6) What have you learned from the fathers that you have interacted with?
There’s that look isn’t there? Every time you, as a new parent, tell another dad about your experiences they stare deep into your soul and give you this expression which says ‘oh, I know all about that mate’. It’s a shared sympathy, mixed with a little bit of smugness that their sleepless nights are mostly finished with now. But the best advice I’ve been given came from a work colleague who told me: “Do what’s best for your daughter, but never feel bad about doing what’s best for you too. If you don’t get the sleep and rest you need then you’ll never be at your best to be a parent.”
Duncan-Browne
7) What else would you share regarding your experiences as a father thus far?
Choose very carefully when and when not to use the word MILF.
8) What have been the most memorable experiences that you have had thus far as a parent?
I’m at the stage that right now everything is memorable. That first feed, that first nappy change, that first long sleep, that first smile (was THAT a smile?). The list goes on and every day there’s a brand new first for me. I must admit, I’m loving it.

If you have any questions for Duncan, please leave a comment here and I will make sure that he gets them so that he may be able to respond!

Also, do you know a Dad in the Limelight? If so, please email me their contact information so that they too can be a part of this series!

Dad of Divas, dadofdivas.com

——————————————————————————————-
New to the Divadom?
Please Subscribe to my RSS Feed! Subscribe in a reader
Questions?Drop me a line at dadofdivas@gmail.com

Dads in the Limelight ( #limelightdads ) – Euri Giles ( @euri_giles ) #dadchat

Dads in the Limelight Series

Our 518th Dad in the Limelight is Euri Giles. I want to thank Euri for being a part of this series. It has been great getting connected with him and now sharing him with all of you.

 

Euri-Giles1) Tell me about yourself, (as well as how you are in the limelight for my readers knowledge)

Hello, my name is Euri Giles – I was named after my grandmother Urabell (nickname Euri, but it’s my full name.)  I always feel like I have to explain that it’s not Russian.  I am a married father of four who works full time in Healthcare IT, and keeps a side hustle blogging about my journey through, Life, Love, Family, Career & Style but mostly just Dad Stuff!  The blog (#Clareifi) is what has put me in the Limelight recently.  I have had an overwhelming response of support, and met so many wonderful people as a result of simply sharing stories about my family.

 

2) Tell me about your family

I am bi-racial (dad is African American, mom is Hispanic).  I choose to identify myself as a human being, or sometimes – “just a dad”.  I am happily married to the most beautiful woman in the world!  This month is our 10 year anniversary.  I am the proud father of four amazing children – Three boys – Lil Euri (not so lil – 17yrs.)  Isaiah – 8yrs, Caleb – 7yrs, & my favorite (sorry boys) – my daughter Leah – 2yrs.  We live in the Texas oasis known as Austin.

 

3) What has been the largest challenge you have had in being a father?

I’d like to think that after 17yrs as a father I can say that I’ve been there done that, and I’m a seasoned pro at this dad thing, but the truth is the largest challenge I’ve had being a father is the uncertainty of what’s next?  What’s the next thing that I have to explain to my children about racism, or war, and why their showing someone get their head cut off on YouTube.  I want more than anything to be able to protect my children, give them a perfect world to grow up in and live in.  The challenge is I have no control of this, I can only protect them within my own bubble of existence, and attempt to educate, and prepare them to be good people who make a positive contribution in our world.

Euri-Giles

4) What advice would you give to other fathers?

The best advice I think I can give to other fathers is to listen!  Listen with the intent of Listening to your children.  Talk to your kids, ask them questions, and seek to understand their response.  Respect their opinions, and encourage dialog with them.  You are your children’s first teacher, don’t miss the opportunity to set them up for success.

 

5) How have you come to balance parenthood and outside life?

I am fortunate enough to have married my best friend who is also my partner in balancing parenthood and outside life.  My wife is a SAHM who keeps the household in order, homework done, music lessons practiced and food in our bellies.  When dad gets home from work – Family time is priority “numero uno”.  We have themed dinners like “Taco Tuesday” and “Pizza Night” usuallyon Thursday’s.  Weekends are for picnics in the park, or exercising together as a family by taking a walk or playing a game of Nerf football.  If dads working on the blog it usually involves the family anyway too, everyone’s input is considered.

 

6) What have you learned from the fathers that you have interacted with?

What I’ve learned from interacting with other fathers is that being a dad can be one of the most challenging, and the most rewarding things that any man will experience in his lifetime.  And that fathers of daughters retain a caveman like chromosome that will stop at nothing to protect daddy’s little girl.

 

7) What else would you share regarding your experiences as a father thus far?
Euri-Giles

The only other thing I could share regarding my experience as a father is in regards to children’s health. Isaiah (my 8 year old son) has a congenital heart condition, classified as Severe Tricuspid Regurgitation – a disorder in which the heart’s tricuspid valve does not close properly, causing blood to flow backward (leak) into the right upper heart chamber (atrium) when the right lower heart chamber (ventricle) contracts.

We have been told that Isaiah will most likely need surgery to repair or replace the valve.  You can’t see a heart disorder on the outside – When you look at Isaiah you will see a healthy looking, gap toothed grinning, book reading, video game playing, no vegetable liking, silly, smart  alack kid.  Of course as parents we worry & stress about doctor visits & his future, but we have to move forward with optimism.  I have faith that he will grow up to be a beautiful person, and a good man

 

8) What have been the most memorable experiences that you have had thus far as a parent?

Wow! That’s a tough one.  My first thought is the miracle of birth of each of my four children.  But there have been so many wonderful milestones along this Dad trip I’m on!  My oldest son’s first gig on drums, Isaiah’s first academic award, Caleb’s first time speaking in front of an audience, or the first time my daughter said “I love you daddy.”  I know there will be so many more wonderful memories to be made.  Life is a journey, and this dad is enjoying the ride.

If you have any questions for Euri, please leave a comment here and I will make sure that he gets them so that he may be able to respond!

Also, do you know a Dad in the Limelight? If so, please email me their contact information so that they too can be a part of this series!

Dad of Divas, dadofdivas.com

——————————————————————————————-
New to the Divadom?
Please Subscribe to my RSS Feed! Subscribe in a reader
Questions?Drop me a line at dadofdivas@gmail.com

Dads in the Limelight ( #limelightdads ) – Oren Miller ( @BloggerFather ) #Dads4Oren

dads4oren
This evening our world lost a great father and friend. In tribute to Oren Miller I am re-running his Dads in the Limelight post that first ran on May 15, 2011. God speed Oren, you will be missed.

Our 127th Dad in the Limelight is Oren Miller from BloggerFather on Twitter, and the blog A Blogger and a Father. I want to thank for Oren being a part of this series. It has been great connected with him and now sharing him with all of you.

 

1) Tell me about yourself, (as well as how you are in the limelight for my readers knowledge)

My name is Oren, which seems very exotic/strange to Americans, but is a very common name in Israel, where I was born. In 2000, I followed my heart all the way to Baltimore, and now I’m here with two dogs, two kids, and only one wife. I started writing a blog called People in the Sun in 2006, but eventually it ran its course. I write mostly now for A Blogger and a Father, where I try to highlight my favorite blogging fathers, while writing some of my own thoughts about fatherhood.

2) Tell me about your family

My wife is this amazing, smart, beautiful woman, and she has a heart of gold. Unfortunately for her, she found me before she had a chance to really see what’s out there. I’ve since stolen the best years of her life. We like folding clothes together. I’m better than her at Wii.

My 3-year-old boy is a beautiful bilingual genius. I also beat him at Wii. I also have a beautiful toothless 1-year-old girl. It goes without saying that I’m better than her at most Wii games.
3) What has been the largest challenge you have had in being a father?

I don’t know much about what I’m supposed to do as a father, but I know what I DON’T like. Avoiding the stuff I don’t like has been my biggest challenge. I hate myself for raising my voice and for losing my patience, but I’m not Buddha, and I don’t always live in the moment, and my mind wanders, and before I know it I find myself yelling at my kid for asking too many questions. I’ve never spanked them (I actually don’t like the word Spank, because it implies something innocent and constructive, when really it’s just hitting a kid), thank God, but remaining calm while setting boundaries and without losing ground to my 3-year-old is an uphill struggle.

 

4) What advice would you give to other fathers?

My advice has always been to remember to be cool. I try to give this advice to myself when I lose it, and I wish I could stand next to me when I’m nearly over the edge, smack myself in the head, and tell myself to chill. My best parenting, no matter what horrible thing I’m reacting to, is always done when I’m calm. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t think yelling at a kid is child-abuse. I just think it’s pointless.

 

5) Seeing that you (or your position) are in the limelight, how have you come to balance parenthood and outside life? If you are currently not in the limelight per se, please still answer this in regards to how you balance parenthood and outside life.

There’s an outside life? See, I wasn’t going to define myself in terms of my family. I was happy being an individual who also had a family. But the change in my self-identity happened, and I can’t find the reason to fight it. I actually like it. I like having them constantly in my mind. I like the fact that when I look at photos of a Cancun hotel we might stay in for our first couple-only vacation in years, all I can think is that my boy would have loved it there… It’s a bit pathetic, but it’s who I am now.

 

6) What have you learned from the fathers that you have interacted with?

There’s been a “We’re all pretty much the same” vibe I got from the first interaction I had with another father, in real life or online. As men, we have our hangups and our oddities, and we come out most of the time as closed-up introverts. But in the end, I noticed that most dads love talking with other dads about fatherhood. We love our kids, and we love seeing other fathers let their guard down and show how much they love their kids too.

 

7) What else would you share regarding your experiences as a father thus far?

I love the Twitter machine. It’s full of good people who can’t wait to say a nice word. Sure, it’s also full of Sarah Palin, but you can set Twitter in a way that ignores the ignorant dumbasses and gives you only great people and great conversations. Being a stay-at-home parent can drive you a bit crazy. Parents used to escape the insanity by finding public places and adult conversation, but now with Twitter we can remain sane and have adult conversations without listening to Christmas music in September!

 

8.) What have been the most memorable experiences that you have had thus far as a parent?

Ooh… Probably bringing the boy back from his granny to meet his sister for the first time (well, there was a first time in the hospital, but he really didn’t know what was going on). He came over to the bed and touched his sister gently, and smiled a real smile, which is something adults have forgotten how to do, and you could sense that he felt his world has changed.

If you have any questions for Oren, please leave a comment here and I will make sure that he gets them so that he may be able to respond!

Also, do you know a Dad in the Limelight? If so, please email me their contact information so that they too can be a part of this series!

——————————————————————————————-
New to the Divadom?
Please Subscribe to my RSS Feed! Subscribe in a reader
Questions?Drop me a line at dadofdivas@gmail.com

%d bloggers like this: