Dads in the Limelight ( #limelightdads ) – Liam Bishop ( @DudasPriest ) #dadchat

Dads in the Limelight Series

Our 431st Dad in the Limelight is Liam Bishop. I want to thank Liam for being a part of this series. It has been great getting connected with him and now sharing him with all of you.

 

Liam Bishop, #limelightdads1) Tell me about yourself, (as well as how you are in the limelight for my readers knowledge)

Hi all! My name is Liam Bishop, I’m a 29 year old dad and a fully grown man-child. It still feels strange saying the dad bit! My new son is just over 5 months old and I have been blogging about it since just before his birth at www.childmanchild.blogspot.com (as much as one person can blog with a 5 month old). I started the blog as a way to chart both of our adventures as we grow up (and possibly mature) together.
I love to read as much as I can (again, how much can one person read with a 5 month old), and so writing the blog has fired up my interest in writing as well. Having said that I work in an office at the moment, and probably will continue doing so until a) I sell my as-yet-unwritten novel or b) win the lottery.
My interests include reading, food, computer games, dragons, clocks and building forts out of cushions.
2) Tell me about your family

I have a 5 month old boy called Albert (or Puke Skywalker as we nicknamed him), who is unbelievably awesome and who I consider a genius (he blows raspberries and flips over!!) without a hint of ironic dad-pride. I have been married to my lovely wife Lucy for a year and a half who also has her own blog (this is the website if you want it http://www.mrsbishopsbakesandbanter.co.uk ) and was the inspiration to start my own blog. I’m going to go ahead with the cliché stuff and say I feel like the luckiest chap out there with such an amazing loving family around me. They rock!
Liam Bishop, #limelightdadsWe also have a cat Pickle (a.k.a. the Furry Menace) who we are hoping to breed soon. A young baby and kittens, what can go wrong?
3) What has been the largest challenge you have had in being a father?

Although I’ve only been a father for 5 months, I have found the hardest part has been coming to terms with the responsibility (just like Spider-Man, with great power etc). Ever since I was little I always wanted younglings of my own, and Lucy and I had talked and planned for it for years, so I was definitely ready. But just knowing that all of a sudden you have a little person’s life you are responsible for, and that they totally depend on you to keep them alive. The reality is that’s a big thing to take on. It has made me re-evaluate how to make decisions and how I do things. I don’t resent it for a second, but it’s a big change in my life and I don’t want to mess it up! I have to raise this boy and make him a respectable member of society (and that’s hard, I almost didn’t make it myself). What bigger challenge is there out there?
Otherwise, everyday fatherhood life I have taken to like I would a free all-you-can-eat buffet. I’ve been gobbling it down and loving it!
Liam Bishop, #limelightdads4) What advice would you give to other fathers?

Funny you should ask this as a friend who is about to become a dad asked me this recently and it’s the subject of a recent blog post (if you want the link http://childmanchild.blogspot.co.uk/2014/01/15-alternative-tips-for-being-new-dad.html). I tried to give my alternative tips for new dads, some little things that help out day-to-day that people don’t often tell you. I’m not sure how much advice I could give yet to fathers with kids years older than mine!
My main bit of proper advice would be to enjoy it. It sounds daft but already Albert seems like a giant, he has changed so much. He is literally growing up a little bit more every day. There is no doubt that parenting is hard and smelly, I think it would be easy to get caught up so much on working/worrying about money/getting no sleep/cleaning poo off the wall that before you know it your baby will be all grown up and you realised you missed it and can’t get that back. I would say just take the time to enjoy it and get the most out of it while you can. Who cares if you’re poor, sleep deprived, unwashed, unshaved, smell like sick and haven’t had a hot cup of coffee for 2 weeks, your baby will only be that small and that cute once!
5) How have you come to balance parenthood and outside life?

Liam Bishop, #limelightdadsOutside life seems like such an odd concept to me now, as to some extent, my whole life is based around that boy. Even when I am out I am thinking about going home to him. But Lucy and I know that it’s important to have a life outside of parenting as well, our relationship is important also. We are making an effort to spend time together, just the two of us every once in a while.
Having said that it’s also important that sometimes you need to let your hair down (if you have hair that is, I ran out a few years back) and let go in whatever way you need to. So if what you need is to go out with your mates and get drunk/dance like a maniac/get a kebab/fall asleep fully clothed in an empty bath/have a massive hangover, then you should. Of if you just want 2 hours of quiet time to share with a Kindle, then that’s good too.
We are lucky to have a large group of family and friends willing to babysit so if we want we can do things and go places without a pushchair!
6) What have you learned from the fathers that you have interacted with?

So many things! I’ll always be learning off other dads. It is not something that I noticed before about dads, but once Lucy became pregnant it became real, I started thinking properly about being a dad and actually speaking to other dads about what that entails. I realised that being a father doesn’t fundamentally change who you are, it just adds to it. You can still be you, you don’t have to solely be defined as ‘just a dad now’. I think it’s important to keep that in mind.
Obviously I learned a lot from my own dad when I was growing up. I find myself doing things and saying things all the time that remind me of him and how he was, and it’s made me look at the relationship we had in new ways, and how I want my relationship with Albert to be.
Liam Bishop, #limelightdads
Finally I’ve learned that almost all dads have shared experiences, no problem or query is unique to me, there is a huge knowledge base out their ripe for plundering. For instance, we all have post-traumatic stress after only just a few weeks of pooey nappies, it’s not just me struggling. We all seem changed in that regards, the things we’ve seen, the horrors. Dads would make good CSIs.
7) What else would you share regarding your experiences as a father thus far?

Only that, as I am sure all fathers know, it can be awesome. Yes it’s been hard, I am sure it will get harder. But it’s still awesome. I basically have a mini-me.
8) What have been the most memorable experiences that you have had thus far as a parent?
The birth which although magical etc, was pretty horrendous for a few moments (I described it at the time like ‘my arse dropping out my stomach’). Holding his hand for the first time. The first time he smiled and laughed at me. The MOAS Incident (MOAS standing for Mother Of All Sh*ts) during a baby-photoshoot.
Probably my most memorable experiences with Albert was the first time we were alone and I was looking after him by myself. It was a couple of weeks after the birth and Lucy was going out for the first time. After she left I realised that it was just me and him together, and his whole attention was on me. I was solely responsible for him for the first time, no backup Mum-SWAT team round the corner. I didn’t do anything except look at him for ages and we shared that moment, I’ll never forget that was the time I properly felt like a true-dad. Then he drank some milk, urinated all over the carpet, fell asleep on me and I played Playstation for a couple of hours while holding him. What a night.

If you have any questions for Liam, please leave a comment here and I will make sure that he gets them so that he may be able to respond!

Also, do you know a Dad in the Limelight? If so, please email me their contact information so that they too can be a part of this series!

Dad of Divas, dadofdivas.com

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Dads in the Limelight ( #limelightdads ) – Scott Posey ( @FatherNerdsBest ) #dadchat

Dads in the Limelight Series

Our 430th Dad in the Limelight is Scott Posey. I want to thank Scott for being a part of this series. It has been great getting connected with him and now sharing him with all of you.

 

Scott Posey, #limelightdads1) Tell me about yourself, (as well as how you are in the limelight for my readers knowledge)
My name is Scott and I blog at www.fathernerdsbest.com (Father Nerds Best). My blog is my attempt to document my son’s life growing up but while also covering the nerdy interests I have. Video games, movies, sci-fi novels, etc. are all passions of mine but the one I cherish the most is my ability to father my son. This blog is my attempt to mix them together (and also indoctrinate my son in the nerd culture – just don’t tell me wife.)
I work in the Advertising industry for a major online Advertising company as a data analyst and have been doing this since college.
2) Tell me about your family
I live in Baltimore, MD with my wife Reilly and son Jack. I’ve been married for 4 years this coming July and my son was born on November 1st, 2013. We are just starting our family and hope to have more kids in the future. We also have a big dog who thinks he is a lap dog and a crazy cat who constantly tries to eat all of the plastic in the house.
3) What has been the largest challenge you have had in being a father?
The largest challenge would most likely have to be the lack of power in certain situations. As a husband, I always try to “fix” things when they are wrong. Through my wife’s pregnancy and birth, I quickly realized there are some things that just can’t be “fixed.” The other challenge would probably be the gear change in life. You aren’t living your life just for you anymore – you have a little one at home who depends on you and needs you to change your life for their well being. It was a little tough at first to change the daily routine of focusing on me but once I did, I was happier and more fulfilled on a daily basis!
Scott Posey, #limelightdads
4) What advice would you give to other fathers?
Basically, I’m a new dad so I don’t have a ton of experience in the fathering department just yet – but what I do know is the birth and days/weeks following. The three things I detail in that post is that:
1) You will be scared and nervous on the big day, and that’s ok
2) Things won’t always go according to plan, roll with the changes
3) It’s ok if you aren’t gushing over your baby right away – it’ll come and this feeling is perfectly normal
Those are three things I quickly learned in the days after the birth that I wish had been told to me before the big day.
Scott Posey, #limelightdads
5) How have you come to balance parenthood and outside life? 
We decided early on that my wife would take two years off of work from her job to stay at home and raise our son while I continue to work. It’s definitely difficult to go from two incomes down to one (and on short notice) but the benefits far outweigh any downsides in my opinion. Having my wife home with Jack keeps me focused on working daily without my mind wondering over how he is in daycare or with a relative. I know my tag team partner is doing a great job at home and that keeps me better focused on my work which in turn helps me better provide for the family.
As for going out with Jack – we’re getting better at that but are still new. We typically take smaller trips to the store or to a friends house and bring Jack with us. Baby wearing has been a big help in this department and something I would have scoffed at before Jack’s birth. Now, I can’t wait to strap on the Tula and carry Jack.
6) What have you learned from the fathers that you have interacted with?
For starters – that there is a huge community out there of dads who talk, blog, and just share experiences with each other. I was stunned to find this and each day I find more dads to follow on Twitter, Blogger, and WordPress. It’s amazing just how many of us are out there who love their kid(s) and want to blog about their experiences of being a father.
As for particular advice – it would have to be to roll with the punches. Things happen that are sometimes out of your control. I read stories daily of fathers issues that have come up in the past where something may not have gone according to plan or an unforeseen circumstance occurs in the worst time but with a cool head, a loving partner/family, you will get through it and learn from the experience.
Scott Posey, #limelightdads
7) What else would you share regarding your experiences as a father thus far?
Every day is truly wonderful as a father. It sounds sappy but it’s really true. I go to work early in the morning so my son is usually still sleeping but I find myself watching the clock at work waiting for the end of the day so I can go home and see him. Being a parent has also brought my wife and I closer together. Becoming a parent changes you in profound ways both physically in terms of your available time and what you need to do to keep a house in order and mentally in how you handle certain situations. I’ve found that my wife and I are much more in tune with each other and able to raise Jack playing off of both of our strengths. There will be disagreements, hopefully mild, but each one can serve as a lesson in parenting and ultimately help in the raising of your child.
8) What have been the most memorable experiences that you have had thus far as a parent?
An easy answer for this is the birth – seeing my son come into this world for the first time and then touching his little hands was a very profound feeling. Getting to know him in the hospital, even with the lack of sleep pretty much each night, was something I will always look back fondly on.
The other moment that really stands out among the others if his first smile. I remember it very clearly. I was changing his diaper on his changing pad and he would usually look us in the eyes when we do this. I remember saying something goofy and he cracked the biggest smile and a little dimple appeared on his right cheek. It was one of the most precious memories I have. I can’t wait until he starts giggling – I’m sure that will be another.

If you have any questions for Scott, please leave a comment here and I will make sure that he gets them so that he may be able to respond!

Also, do you know a Dad in the Limelight? If so, please email me their contact information so that they too can be a part of this series!

Dad of Divas, dadofdivas.com

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Dads in the Limelight ( #limelightdads ) – Charlie Seymour Jr. ( @Grandsonlessons ) #dadchat

Dads in the Limelight Series

Our 429th Dad in the Limelight is Charlie Seymour Jr.. I want to thank Charlie for being a part of this series. It has been great getting connected with him and now sharing him with all of you.

 

Charlie Seymour Jr., #limelightdads1) Tell me about yourself, (as well as how you are in the limelight for my readers knowledge)

Little did I know at age 11, when a Dupont scientist (whose job was to invent VHS tape) taught me video directing at our local theater, that I’d grow up to use my producing skills to help people profit through online marketing and video. Now I’m a husband, dad, and granddad. I know in my heart how powerful video is (I’m often called the Video-Crazed MBA Marketer). Oh, sure – I have an MBA from Wharton and an award-winning sales and marketing record, but it’s this early learning that sets me apart.

Not long after losing my father, I started a website, LessonsFromMyGrandson.com, so that my grandson would never grow up not knowing who I was. He won’t remember my Dad, but he’ll remember me: we will live forever on the Internet, and video is the best way to do it.

And in my own little world, I guess my 15 minutes of fame come from a best-selling book, years directing theater (in a theater where 5 generations of my family have acted and directed), my activities at church, and through the many videos I create for my own work and for clients’ success.

Charlie Seymour Jr., #limelightdads2) Tell me about your family

Growing up in a stable family of three kids, a dad, a mom, and many relatives close by, family has always been important to me. Holidays were huge – lots of food smells wafting through our house, noisy chatter of family, and warm hugs and stories.

But the biggest change for me was having kids. One as soon as I was married (who was 9 years old when I met her) and then a biological child a couple of years later. They are now 42 and 30 years old. Wow… life changing.

And I thought nothing could top that until… until my grandson was born. I promised my younger daughter (his mother) that no one would take her place in my heart, and that’s still true: but 29-month old grandson, Beckett, sure has carved out a HUGE part of my life and my love. I never had a son, so perhaps part of my love is because I now have a boy to share things with. And his 7-month old sister is making her way deep into my life and heart too.

Charlie Seymour Jr., #limelightdads3) What has been the largest challenge you have had in being a father?

Knowing when to help, advise, instruct.

One time I suggested to my younger daughter that she should chat with Mom as well (I never passed off either of my daughters to my wife: never said, “that’s a subject for you and Mom,” because I knew I’d never learn that way. But therewere times when I thought Mom should be included as well… and from the child’s invitation and not my quiet whispers). When I suggested that, she said, “Oh, Dad: Mom talks like a man.”

Took me a while to recover from that one. What did that mean about the way I talked?!!

But what she meant was: Mom wanted to solve problems and not just discuss them, letting our daughter figure out the answer on her own. I’m a pretty directed guy, so offering advice comes easily to me. Many times I had to hold back, open a “what do you think should happen” conversations, and just be there to love her.

4) What advice would you give to other fathers?

Be there. Listen. Ask what your child wants as help. Don’t judge, or she/he will stop going to you.

And love them with all your heart.

OH… and give them room to fail. Parents that hover and fix things before they’re broken often do a disservice to their kids – we all learn by doing, as much as we’d like to wave a magic wand to cure all ills.
We get only one chance with these kids – let’s make the most of it!

Charlie Seymour Jr., #limelightdads5) How have you come to balance parenthood and outside life? 

I’ve been fortunate. I did really well in investment real estate sales and then decided to leave it when the market went bad. (Chuckling to myself… I know: which time did it go bad? I’m referring to the early 90s.)

Most of my life I have worked from home. I was there when my kids took naps (nothing like kisses as they went down and nothing like hugs when they woke up!) and when they returned from school. I have been a Work At Home Dad if not truly a Stay At Home Dad.

And there were times I had to say NO to my family and NO to the outside world. I tuned in to what I thought my family would feel was important and worked hard to keep them in mind.

6) What have you learned from the fathers that you have interacted with?

Wow, so many things!

Peace. Patience. Ways to involve kids in journeys I never thought about. Ways to encourage kids to do their best. And ways to be independent and at the same time interdependent.

7) What else would you share regarding your experiences as a father thus far?

Life for a father of girls changes the second she says, “I’m engaged.” And then life explodes with all kinds of emotions and possibilities when she says, “I’m pregnant.”

I was totally unprepared for life as a granddad. People could tell me about the joys, the fun, the chance to teach that next generation (even as you handed them back to their parents for the day-to-day challenges of parenting)… but it has been MUCH more than I expected.

If I could spend all my time helping my grandson (I admit I haven’t gotten to know my granddaughter as well, but her personality is just beginning to shine forth), I would be happy. Deep-inside happy. Limbic-brain, deeply-emotional happy. My LessonsFromMyGrandson.com site is a labor of love – a love for Beckett that I hope others enjoy too.

Charlie Seymour Jr., #limelightdads
8) What have been the most memorable experiences that you have had thus far as a parent?

Sitting my (then) soon-to-be step daughter on my knee to tell her that I wouldn’t replace her biological father and her looking up to me to ask, “What does that mean? The only word I know like that is bibliography.” Cute!

Seeing my younger daughter “fly” as Peter Pan when she was in 7th grade – the family theater tradition lived on.

Helping my younger daughter produce her first music CD (LizSeymour.com), staying in the background, helping to encourage her and market for her.

Holding my daughter when in tears she came to me after breaking up with a long-time boyfriend, when not getting a big part in a musical (she so often did that this was a shock to her), when contractions filled her with pain before her first delivery.

Watching her become Miss West Chester University using a platform of anti-smoking since secondhand smoke is what killed her material grandmother.
Walking her down the aisle, holding her closely… both of us holding back tears.

Watching her grow into the role of motherhood… something she does very well.

One more: A few years ago I ended an email to Liz with “Your Daddy Loves You!” When it came to texting, I shortened that to YDLY! which has become an important signature between us, especially when she discovered that YDLY! can also mean Your DAUGHTER Love You! Sweet!

 
If you have any questions for Charlie, please leave a comment here and I will make sure that he gets them so that he may be able to respond!

Also, do you know a Dad in the Limelight? If so, please email me their contact information so that they too can be a part of this series!

Dad of Divas, dadofdivas.com

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Dads in the Limelight ( #limelightdads ) – R.C. Liley ( @going_dad ) #dadchat

Dads in the Limelight Series

Our 428th Dad in the Limelight is R.C. Liley. I want to thank R.C. for being a part of this series. It has been great getting connected with him and now sharing him with all of you.

 

R.C. Liley, #limelightdads

1) Tell me about yourself, (as well as how you are in the limelight for my reader’s knowledge).
Hey there, my name is R.C. Liley and I’m a stay-at-home dad as of January 28th, 2014. I left my job in the accounting world to raise our beautiful daughter, Avery.
I used to blog about healthy food and health in general at http://justaddcayenne.blogspot.com/ when I had time, but that has since subsided. There’s still good recipes there though! Now I started a new blog to document our adventure of raising Avery and anything else I care to share. My new blog is https://goingdad.wordpress.com/.
I am very into exercise and nutrition and hope to find work in these areas after a few years. I’d love to help others turn their lives around and learn to start being active and enjoying real, healthy food.
2) Tell me about your family.
I have been married to my lovely wife, Kelley, for 6.5 years. We have a 3 month old daughter, Avery , a Golden Retriever (Abby), a fat black cat (Lou), and a testy box turtle (Tash). Our first pet as a couple was a cat, Gus, and he passed away while Kelley was pregnant. We miss him.
R.C. Liley, #limelightdads
3) What has been the largest challenge you have had in being a father?
Being only 3 months into it, I’m sure there are many more to come, but just trying to figure our daughter out is difficult. I feel like I know why she’s fussy, but after exhausting the few options a baby would have, I’m at a loss sometimes.
Also, I’m a person who thrives on consistency, and as all parents know, babies are not consistent. I was used to having a laid out workout routine that I’d know when and where I’d be ahead of time. Now, I just do what I can, when I can.
4) What advice would you give to other fathers?
Being a father for only 3 months now, I don’t have too much advice to offer and should probably be taking more than giving! One thing I do know is to make sure you don’t let your offspring cause you and your wife or partner to argue. The last thing that’s needed is trying to figure out how to raise your baby AND arguing with your significant other.
Make sure the both of you are on the same page and talk things through. Doing this has been a huge help for my wife and I as we figure out being parents.
R.C. Liley, #limelightdads
5) How have you come to balance parenthood and outside life?
Ha, before I became a dad I was homebody, and now that I am a dad, I’m still a homebody. I quit really going out in my mid-twenties as I became more health conscious and didn’t value the food and drink provided at restaurants.
I can’t stand not knowing how my food is being prepared, and I always compare the price of dishes to what I could be having at home for much less. This really applies to drinks. The price of one beer at a restaurant is the same as a six pack or bottle of wine at home. No thanks.
Plus, as a stay-at-home dad, I don’t really expect to get out much besides shopping for food and I’m perfectly fine with that; for now.
6) What have you learned from the fathers that you have interacted with?
In speaking with other fathers, I’m learned everyone has their own opinion/style on how to raise their kid, but I need to figure things out for myself. I use the advice as guidance to form my own style and take it from there. One thing I have heard from all fathers and am making sure I do is to appreciate the time I have holding Avery. Time goes too fast, and I don’t want to spend it trying really hard to “train” her to sleep away from us or other ways to make her independent. I know that time will come too soon anyway.
R.C. Liley, #limelightdads
7) What else would you share regarding your experiences as a father thus far?
Once you become a father, something inside of you changes; usually for the better. The moment I witnessed Avery being born, I had goose bumps run across my body and best feeling coupled with anxiety flowed through me. It might sound corny, but everything I do now, has a different purpose than before. Becoming a father has already changed the way I view things in these 3 months and even my wife, Kelley, has noticed I’ve changed for the better.
That said, try not to look too far ahead and focus more on the present. Time is known for sneaking up on you and biting you right in the rear. Oh wait, that’s your toddler who you could’ve sworn was still a tiny infant in your arms.
8) What have been the most memorable experiences that you have had thus far as a parent?
Listening to our daughter’s cry’s change so much just over these 3 months, it’s crazy how all of the precious coos and screams alike just fill my heart every time.
When we go on walks, I wear Avery in our Baby Bjorn and love when she just falls asleep. Even in the cold, wet weather, I’ll continue walking until she wakes. Also, those late nights or early mornings when she’s fussy, I will bring her to the recliner and rock her back to sleep. I can’t describe the overwhelming happiness I feel just watching her peacefully sleep on my chest.

If you have any questions for R.C., please leave a comment here and I will make sure that he gets them so that he may be able to respond!

Also, do you know a Dad in the Limelight? If so, please email me their contact information so that they too can be a part of this series!

Dad of Divas, dadofdivas.com

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Dads in the Limelight ( #limelightdads ) – Mark McNulty ( @BloggyDad ) #dadchat

Dads in the Limelight Series

Our 427th Dad in the Limelight is Mark McNulty. I want to thank Mark for being a part of this series. It has been great getting connected with him and now sharing him with all of you.

 

Mark McNulty, #limelightdads1) Tell me about yourself, (as well as how you are in the limelight for my readers knowledge)

My name is Mark McNulty and I am an at-home Dad to my 7-month old daughter. I am a Boston native and continue to live there with my family. My little girl? She is truly the greatest thing that ever happened to me.

 

I am in the limelight because I am an active advocate for responsible, involved fatherhood. My interest in this actually started when I was teaching elementary school for the past thirteen years and now I pursue it through my blog, The New American Dad (www.BloggyDad.net). In 2013 I co-founded the Boston Dads Group with two fellow bloggers. I am also a children’s author with one book for middle readers on the market, titled The Sea Shack, and two additional books in production.
2) Tell me about your family

My wife Carolyn is a medical professional here in Massachusetts and our daughter, Molly, is currently seven months old. We also have a cat and a golden retriever who have both grown very jealous of their new little sister!

 

Mark McNulty, #limelightdads3) What has been the largest challenge you have had in being a father?

Certainly the vast amount of work has been a challenge, since a baby keeps you busy from sunrise to sunset and beyond. Balancing that constant responsibility with my work and outside interests can be tough. I think the biggest challenge, however, has been the isolation of being a stay-at-home Dad. I have always been surrounded by countless students and teachers during my career in education. It was a job where you were never, ever alone. Now there are several days where I go many hours without talking to another adult. It has been a unique and surprising challenge that took some time to adjust to.

 

4) What advice would you give to other fathers?

Trust your instincts. There will be times when you worry if you are doing something right or not, but your natural caring instincts will always serve you well.

Give yourself a break. You can’t do it all. Parenting is an overwhelming and stressful job at times. Know your limits, don’t be afraid to ask for help, and make sure you take time to take care of yourself. It is not selfish to maintain your emotional, mental, and physical health for your child. It makes you a better Dad.

Be ready to forgive yourself. You will make mistakes. You will do things wrong. It is okay. Every parent does it. Your kid is fine, so cut yourself some slack and move forward a wiser man.

Plan ahead. This doesn’t mean you will always be able to keep your plan, but making one helps a lot. Look ahead to the next day or week. What do you need to get done? What does your wife need to get done? How are you going to both meet those goals? Again… kids have a talent for disrupting even the best-laid plans, but this is a habit that can save you a lot of time and stress during the day.

 

Mark McNulty, #limelightdads

5) How have you come to balance parenthood and outside life? 

Honestly? It is something I still work on. Being a dad is always my first priority. Then I throw my work as a writer and blogger on top of that, usually at night or on weekends, and often I find myself over-burdened with this incredible strain. Since my daughter is the reason I work so hard as a writer and a blogger, all the stress gets tied together so easily. Life can get unbalanced pretty quickly!

 

Take a breath. Like I said, you really need to give yourself a break and allow some down time. My wife is actually very good at helping with this. She usually recognizes when I need these breaks and will push me in that direction. I think having an understanding and supportive partner is huge in making this balance work effectively. It might be an activity like archery or hiking, or just sitting on the sofa and enjoying a Bruins game, but having the support to allow these healthy interests can make all the difference.

 

6) What have you learned from the fathers that you have interacted with?

A lot! The more I got involved with my fellow Dad bloggers, the more I learned what an amazingly supportive community they are. There are so many great ideas and helpful suggestions that I have found out there… everything from sleep strategies to helpful web sites to books on fatherhood.

 

Long before I met them, however, I was inspired by many other great Dads. My own Dad was the best example of responsible, involved fatherhood I could have asked for, and I had many other inspiring models in my family and neighborhood, as well. Throughout my teaching career I had the opportunity to meet dozens of caring, supportive fathers and saw the many ways they showed this to their children. All of these devoted fathers had some part in making me the Dad I am today.

 

Mark McNulty, #limelightdads

I also hope more Dads take an active role in changing the stereotypes and double standards that continue to exist out there. When I am out with my daughter, I often hear comments that are amusing and insulting at the same time. Whether I am being congratulated for spending a little time with my baby so her mother can have a break, or hearing how amazed someone is that I am able to feed her a bottle, it astonishes me that these assumptions still exist. And the stores or restaurants that only put changing tables in the women’s room? Don’t get me started on that. There are so many incredible, loving, involved Dads out there. They don’t need heaps of praise or trophies, just a little more respect and acceptance in society. We are definitely on the right track and have made a ton of progress, but we need to keep working at it.

7) What else would you share regarding your experiences as a father thus far?

Enjoy every moment. Savor them all. My baby is only seven months old and I already look back on those first weeks and months with longing. Those days and nights might feel incredibly stressful when you are in the moment, but that stress fades away and only the happy, joyful memories remain. Each short phase of a child’s life passes so quickly, leaving only pictures and video in its wake. So, no matter how old your child is, make sure you pause to enjoy this specific time in their life before it has passed for good.

 

8) What have been the most memorable experiences that you have had thus far as a parent?

Those first few days and nights in the hospital were incredible, filled with so much love and joy for this little girl. I have a photo of her holding my finger right after birth and I treasure it to no end. She has taken many long naps on my shoulder, sometimes up to two hours. I loved every single one of them. Nothing has ever made me feel stronger or more powerful as a man than the ability to comfort my crying infant. I took her to Fenway Park for a Red Sox practice one day and to the Franklin Park Zoo on another day, and those are both great memories. And, of course, there are the milestones. Her first smile, first laugh, crawling and standing… these moments are priceless and will stay with me forever. Her first Christmas was also a very special time, since she is clearly the greatest gift we have ever received. I could go on forever. Each moment just feels so special in its own way and I know we have many, many more ahead of us.
If you have any questions for Mark, please leave a comment here and I will make sure that he gets them so that he may be able to respond!

Also, do you know a Dad in the Limelight? If so, please email me their contact information so that they too can be a part of this series!

Dad of Divas, dadofdivas.com

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Dads in the Limelight ( #limelightdads ) – Mike Crider ( @TheFatherOTwins ) #dadchat

Dads in the Limelight Series

Our 426th Dad in the Limelight is Mike Crider. I want to thank Mike for being a part of this series. It has been great getting connected with him and now sharing him with all of you.

 

Mike Crider, #limelightdads 1) Tell me about yourself, (as well as how you are in the limelight for my readers knowledge)

First of all, I want to thank Chris for the opportunity to share my experiences and it’s an honor and a privilege to get to be a part of a series that has been going on for so long.  My name is Mike Crider, and I am the father of twin girls.  I guess you could say I’m in the limelight for a couple of reasons.  First, I am a middle school assistant principal, so that makes me a little different than the average dad with a blog.  Secondly, I’m pretty active on Twitter and am the founder of #TwinsChat, a Twitter chat for parents of twins that takes place on Tuesdays at 9 pm EST.  This is still a relatively new adventure for me but it’s been a lot of fun and while we only started on December 30, our community is slowly growing.  I have a blog called “The Father of Twins“.  I use this as an opportunity to talk about my experiences raising twin toddlers, but have been known to go off on tangents as well.  Almost nothing is off-limits.
2) Tell me about your family.
I have been married to my wife, Holly, for 7.5 years now, and we will have been together for a decade in November.  I have twin toddler girls, M and N, who are 2.5 years now and are really hard to keep up with.  We live a minute from my parents-in-law and 500 miles away from my parents.  We reside in North Carolina, USA.
3) What has been the largest challenge you have had in being a father?
I think my biggest challenge has been finding the balance between work and family.  My job is one that requires long hours sometimes, and as a salary employee, I don’t get paid extra for burning the midnight oil; sometimes it’s just required.  Every person that has a career that’s important to them wants to be the best employee they can be, but when you have a family you don’t want that goal to be achieved at the expense of them.  I don’t get to spend a lot of time with my girls during the week, but definitely hang out with them a lot on weekends.  I’ve written about “daddy guilt” at times on my blog, but sometimes I leave home feeling like a bad father and leave work feeling like a bad employee.
Mike Crider, #limelightdads
4) What advice would you give to other fathers?
You want to try to educate yourself on how to be a great father, but if you read too much it just makes you paranoid.  Listen to doctors, use common sense, and don’t be afraid to ask questions.  Don’t forgot about the person that made you a father, either.  It’s easy to do, especially with twins.  Make time for that person and find people you trust to watch your kids from time to time.  Don’t be a martyr just because you don’t trust anyone.  You need some alone time with your significant other.
5) How have you come to balance parenthood and outside life?
I touched on this in #3, but the balance has been difficult.  One of the things that hasn’t been as big of a challenge for me is that because of the nature of my job, I don’t have a lot of friends.  Actually, I have virtually none, so I interact with people via social media, but people that live around a lot of their friends can face challenges when they don’t know how to cope with kids running around.
Mike Crider, #limelightdads 6) What have you learned from the fathers that you have interacted with?
I’ve learned that just about all of the frustrations, joys, sarcastic remarks, and general thoughts I’ve had, other fathers have had at some point.  It’s ok to get upset, just don’t take it out on your family, and do what you need to do to get it out of your system without lashing out at them.  Also, you need to have outlets, or else you will go crazy.  Maybe it’s exercise, time with friends/family, heck, maybe it’s alone time (sometimes I need that).  A couple needs to have those discussions to make sure both parties stay sane.
7) What else would you share regarding your experiences as a father thus far?
It’s not easy, and there’s no right way to do it, but there’s a lot of wrong ways.  Sometimes, if you let your guard down, you can fall into that trap.  Your kids, after all, are kids, and they are typically doing something because they can’t help it.  A father’s job is to teach and model.
8) What have been the most memorable experiences that you have had thus far as a parent?
I don’t know if there’s been just one, but it seems like the girls continue to meet new milestones, and I think seeing them develop right in front of your eyes is a pretty cool experience.  Sometimes it’s a little sad to admit, but it’s nice seeing them grow up the way they should.  We always hope in life we can provide our children with the best possible experience.  I’ve enjoyed interacting with other fathers who are documenting similar experiences, and I just hope that through my blog or Twitter chats or something, I can help someone else stay encouraged.
Again, thanks for thinking of me and allowing me an opportunity to appear on your blog.  You can find my blog at http://www.thefatheroftwins.com and on Twitter at http://twitter.com/TheFatherOTwins.  My FB page is http://www.facebook.com/thefatheroftwins, and I have a Pinterest account but I’ll spare you on that one.  Thanks!

If you have any questions for Mike, please leave a comment here and I will make sure that he gets them so that he may be able to respond!

Also, do you know a Dad in the Limelight? If so, please email me their contact information so that they too can be a part of this series!

Dad of Divas, dadofdivas.com

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Dads in the Limelight ( #limelightdads ) – James Ward ( @dadsdenjames ) #dadchat

James Ward, #limelightdads

Dads in the Limelight Series

Our 443rd Dad in the Limelight is James Ward. I want to thank James for being a part of this series. It has been great getting connected with him and now sharing him with all of you.

1) Tell me about yourself, (as well as how you are in the limelight for my readers knowledge)

My name is James, I am an information junky and think outside the box. I am from southern Missouri, and grew up on a farm. I work as a System Administrator (I am the IT department) for a mid-sized company, and family is very important to me. I’m not sure why I’m in the “Limelight”, but let’s rock and run with it. You can read more about my life on my blog - http://presentdaydad.blogspot.com 2) Tell me about your family. We are a modern day, natural living family. We are gluten free and eat as natural as possible. My amazing wife and three year old are my life. We make sure to have fun and laugh at each other. The wife is a stay at home mom and well, the toddler is busy being a toddler. We have had a few bumps in the road, but that’s life and you take what you have. 

James Ward, #limelightdads3) What has been the largest challenge you have had in being a father?

There are many challenges that I have faced as a father. I’m sure everyone has challenges and adapt to them as they come. My biggest challenge that I have faced is having a child that had a fatal birth defect. It was a little over a year ago that my world got turned upside down. We were pregnant with our second daughter and during a routine ultrasound, the tech stopped and said she would be right back. Something wasn’t right. I have been to these before and things just don’t stop. Maybe she had to go to the bathroom. She came back and finished a few things and we left. We got a phone call an hour later and the doctor wanted to see us. Our daughter had a defect called anencephaly, a fatal defect that the upper part of her brain did not develop. We made the decision to complete the pregnancy and spend what time we could with our little angel. Yes, this was devastating knowing that our daughter was going to be born in this world and we would have to give her back. We didn’t know how long, but I would NEVER choose the other option. That was the most challenging, but also the best 6 hours and 27 minutes she could have given us.

4) What advice would you give to other fathers?

Just like marriage and anything else you do in life, patience is the key. You are going to be tested and you will be on the verge of losing your composure. The key is to stop and use patience. Remember that the first few years are an overwhelming wave of emotions for both you and your children. I’m not saying all kids are bad. I’m saying that there is a lot going on in that little head of theirs. 

5) How have you come to balance parenthood and outside life? 

My outside life is very busy. I am the only IT staff covering 250 employees and 7 sites around the US. I am the IT department. That is very taxing on one person and there is always something going on. I also maintain a couple of blogs, and read a LOT of blogs. I take my evening after work to play and interact with my family. We play and do crafts, the wife and I hang out on the couch with the TV off and phones are put on a desk across the room. I always take a couple of hours after work to sit back and enjoy our family. 

James Ward, #limelightdads6) What have you learned from the fathers that you have interacted with?

I have learned that I am not alone. There is always someone there that can relate. I do not have many Dad friends other than the Dad bloggers that I talk to online. There really isn’t a reason that I do not interact with other local Dads. I guess the only reason that I can think of is the area that I live in is a farm driven community. The fathers work on the farm and they do not play as strong of a roll as I do.

7) What else would you share regarding your experiences as a father thus far?

The roll of the Dad in a household has evolved over the years. They are no longer the image of authority (just wait til your dad gets home) and they interact with the entire family. I grew up in a house that I rarely saw my Dad. He was always working or finding something else to provide for the family.  James Ward, #limelightdads

8) What have been the most memorable experiences that you have had thus far as a parent?

Children are always learning, watching, judging, and interacting. They are not an annoyance that is always needy. When they ask you something, it’s because they are learning. Teaching, as a parent, starts as soon as you look at your new bundle of joy. If you have any questions for James, please leave a comment here and I will make sure that he gets them so that he may be able to respond!

Also, do you know a Dad in the Limelight? If so, please email me their contact information so that they too can be a part of this series!

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Dads in the Limelight ( #limelightdads ) – Ryan Maier ( @dadlifts ) #dadchat

Dads in the Limelight Series

Our 424th Dad in the Limelight is Ryan Maier. I want to thank Ryan for being a part of this series. It has been great getting connected with him and now sharing him with all of you.

 

Ryan Maier, #limelightdads1)    Tell me about yourself, (as well as how you are in the limelight for my readers knowledge)

My name is Ryan Maier, I live in Minneapolis, MN with my wife, Katie, and two kids; Ainsley (3) and Thaine (1).  I am the founder and owner of a website for dads, called DadLifts.com, as well as serving as The Fitness Program Director and Coordinator for the Every Thing For Dads Foundation. I’m also a personal trainer and certified USA Weightlifting Sports Performance Coach. 
2) Tell me about your family

My wife Katie, is a 5th grade teacher, as well as a professional photographer. My kids, Ainsley and Thaine, are very young still, so we spend as much of our time with them as possible. In fact, my website, DadLifts, started out of my frustration for the lack of quality time I was able to spend with my daughter when she was born because of work, stress, diet, lack of sleep, etc. I vowed to get my life in order, so I could be a better father and spend more quality time with them; and here we are today with another child, a new website, two different careers and a lot less stress in our lives.

 

Ryan Maier, #limelightdads3) What has been the largest challenge you have had in being a father?

 

For me, it’s putting the cell phone, ipad, computer down (I still work for a major wireless company for my day job) after work and being available to listen, play, and just be present with my kids for a few hours every night.  That’s been the biggest adjustment for me, by far, especially because I have ADD.

 

4) What advice would you give to other fathers?

Two things:

a)    GET IN TOUCH WITH AND LEARN TO DEAL WITH YOUR OWN EMOTIONS!  I can not tell you how much stress this has taken off my marriage, but also has made it exponentially simpler to raise my children.  Once you understand how emotions and behaviors are linked, and you know what actions are needed to resolve each emotion, and can model that appropriately (we all have our outbursts, so don’t think I’m perfect, by any means), your job as a parent becomes so much less stressful.  Imagine knowing what actions you can help your child take to help them calm down, when they seem inconsolable. That, to me, is gold.

 

b)    I have come to realize, that it’s not so much about the quantity of time I get to spend with my kids, especially at this young age when they really have no concept of time, so much as it is about the quality of the time I spend with them. One thing I’ve started doing, that helps me be present and aware of what I’m doing is, I try to ask myself as much as possible, “Is this the best I can be doing right now?” when I’m with my kids.  And, whenever that answer is no, I just remove or add whatever it is that’s keeping from doing my best, or will allow me to do better at that moment.  Sometimes, my best isn’t THE BEST, but it’s the best I can do at that moment, and I think it’s important for my kids to see me at my best, and not at my best.  But even more importantly, they get to see what I do to make our time together better, and hopefully, they will pick up on this and use it to help them spend their time better as they get older.

 

5) How have you come to balance parenthood and outside life?

I’ve been forced to start living like a responsible adult and planning ahead for things, so I can balance my crazy life and allow for that quality time with my kids. 

Also, I’ve had to learn how to say no.  My kids come first, but I’m often asked to help others at work, and many times I’ve had to turn down helping those people, which I wouldn’t have done in the past.

Ryan Maier, #limelightdads

6) What have you learned from the fathers that you have interacted with?

I’ve learned so many things from other fathers, but the one thing that stands out is, what may work for some people, doesn’t necessarily work for others. Seek advice, but do what works best for you and your family’s situation.

I’ve learned that most fathers know what needs to be done, but not many of us were ever taught how to get to the end result. That was a problem to me.  And that’s why I started DadLifts.

 

7) What else would you share regarding your experiences as a father thus far?

Before my wife and I had kids, I always had this “idea” of what it would look like when I was “ready” to have kids. In hindsight, none of that helped me prepare. There is no sure fire way to be “ready”.  The best thing you can do is prepare to be unprepared, often.  For me, Most of all, I miss sleep. But if I knew I could be so productive on two hours of sleep before I had kids, I’d have a lot more money now. 

 

8) What have been the most memorable experiences that you have had thus far as a parent?

It’s very hard to pick just a few.  And, since my kids are still very young, every small milestone now, seems like it’ll be the most memorable one.  But, I’d have to say the most memorable experiences for me, are the ones I get to experience every night.  Putting my daughter to bed while reading a story is something we do every single night, and those moments are definitely the ones I’ll miss the most when she’s 16 and embarrassed to be seen with me. For my son, it’s the same – rocking him to sleep at night brings me so much joy.  These are the things that I remember most. 
If you have any questions for Ryan Maier, please leave a comment here and I will make sure that he gets them so that he may be able to respond!

Also, do you know a Dad in the Limelight? If so, please email me their contact information so that they too can be a part of this series!

Dad of Divas, dadofdivas.com

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Dads in the Limelight ( #limelightdads ) – Scott Harpole ( @ScottHarpole ) #dadchat

Dads in the Limelight Series

Our 423rd Dad in the Limelight is Scott Harpole. I want to thank Scott for being a part of this series. It has been great getting connected with him and now sharing him with all of you.

 

Scott Harpole, #Limelightdads1) Tell me about yourself, (as well as how you are in the limelight for my readers knowledge)
My name is Scott Harpole and with four children I’ve had a lifetime of practicing as a father. I’ve made a boatload of mistakes and yet have been blessed with some amazing kids and a great life.
I’m in the limelight because of my original, creative children’s stories. I am the creator of My Dad’s Bedtime Stories (www.mydadsbestimestories.com) and the book “Sleepy Beach”. Which is guaranteed by the way to put kids to sleep!
I have been telling stories to my children for two decades plus and have begun to share them as free audios on my site. I am also a musician and I play the piano music for the Sleepy Beach CD track and for each of the intro’s to the audio stories.
2) Tell me about your family
I have been married for 25 years to Jenn, the love of my life. That seems like a long time, even to me! I don’t how many years the original marriage contract was for. We will probably re-up soon for another 25!
I have four children; a 24 year old daughter and three sons that are 21, 13 and 12. The best reason I can give for the 8 year gap in the middle is … temporary amnesia.
Scott Harpole, #Limelightdads3) What has been the largest challenge you have had in being a father?
My current challenge is to keep my 12 and 13 year old boys from killing each other. There’s some fine line between brothers just getting on each other’s nerves and another world war in the living room. I think we crossed that line a few months ago. Jenn and I have had talks with each of them, talks together as a family, prayer, pleadings, groundings, threatening’s and nearly expulsion.
Currently they are doing great and I am holding my breath. But any peaceful moment could dissolve into “I hit him because took the game controller” or “he just makes me mad and refused to let me in his room”.
This is not to say that the adult children are off the radar, but they need other guidance and fatherly help of a different level of interaction.
4) What advice would you give to other fathers?
Patience and Time are the key words to fathers. We men tend to think about one major thing at a time. According to our wives it is our best and worst trait. Because of that trait, it is very easy to become impatient with our children. After all we have things we have to accomplish, the weight of the family in many ways is resting on our shoulders, we have to-do lists of things to finish, we have downtime that we deserve. But at the end of our child rearing days, nothing will substitute for those precious times with our kids. You can’t do them again. There isn’t enough money or toys you can throw at your children to replace your time with them.
I remember taking my little girl and boy out to look at the stars and getting up on top of the van so we could see them better! They still talk about that 15 plus years later.
There is a mighty struggle that we face between what is an appropriate amount of time working (because we have to do at least some of that) and spending time with our kids. Nobody on this planet will give you the joy of your family and it is worth your life to invest your Patience and Time with them.
Scott Harpole, #Limelightdads5) How have you come to balance parenthood and outside life?
I’m in the limelight because my wife has encouraged me to share these bedtime stories with the world. I have been stuck forever on what to do, or how to do it, instead of just doing what I do and not worrying about the rest. So I am on this journey, of getting my stories to the world, and taking my family along with me. My children are my biggest fans. They all critique what I’m doing and how the website looks, for example. I have planned to take my younger children on my trips to tell stories to elementary classrooms.
I love being with my family and nothing trumps that. I think it is much easier to be connected with family if they are a part of what I’m doing.
6) What have you learned from the fathers that you have interacted with?
The best thing I’ve learned from other fathers is that you can’t ruin your children by making honest mistakes. I’m talking about those kinds of mistakes we all make and will continue to make, when we are trying to do the best thing but it doesn’t really work out. My faith in God and His grace are foundational to my life. In that context, there isn’t a perfect family path that you have totally destroyed because you blew it as a father.
The best way to understand that is to think about the chess match between Deep Blue, the computer, and Gary Kasparov, the Russian Grandmaster. It was said that Deep Blue could evaluate 200,000 chess moves per second! Now imagine the God of the universe, playing chess with me instead of against me. No matter how bad a mistake I make as a father, He has the complete ability to make good come out of that situation (if I let him!). For every stupid choice I make, He has contingency plans out the kazoo that will make all things come out for the good.
Scott Harpole, #Limelightdads7) What else would you share regarding your experiences as a father thus far?
I absolutely love being a father. Life would be missing a humongous amount of worth if that was suddenly taken from me. Trading the joys and pains of being a father for the benefits of having more money, time and an unblemished house as a childless couple, are not even comparable. Zip. Nada. Zero. I can’t imagine life without my children. I am without doubt a different and better man because of my wife and kids.
8) What have been the most memorable experiences that you have had thus far as a parent? 
I have had so many memorable experiences that it is difficult to pick. One time recently, I was taking my younger boys home from elementary school. We decided that this was a way for me to be more involved in their lives, and my wife was shocked at the things they were learning on the bus anyway.
We were turning by Collet Park and I was about to ask the usual questions, such as  “How was your day? What did you learn?” I had this crazy idea and stopped them midsentence. I said “Boys, we have to wait to tell our stories at the Telling Tree.” They asked what I was talking about, of course. I told them that we were going to hold hands around this elm tree, right next to the road on the edge of the park. “Grant will tell me something about his day in my ear and then I’ll pass it on to Max. Next, Max will pass around something about his day and I’ll do the same.” The funniest thing was the reaction of other kids as they walked and biked down the sidewalk.
Some of them asked the boys if were trying to get oxygen from the tree or holding the tree up or even tree worshippers! When they heard the story, they said they wished they had their own Telling Tree.
It was around this time that I realized that I wasn’t like the typical Dad! I have stories that need to be told and shared with the world.
I have even created an audio story from this experience called The Telling Tree and hopefully the idea will spread. How immensely cool would it be to drive by a park and see a Dad and his kids holding hands around a tree, telling each other a story about their day!

If you have any questions for Scott, please leave a comment here and I will make sure that he gets them so that he may be able to respond!

Also, do you know a Dad in the Limelight? If so, please email me their contact information so that they too can be a part of this series!

Dad of Divas, dadofdivas.com

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Dads in the Limelight ( #limelightdads ) – David Kepley ( @justadad247 ) #dadchat

Dads in the Limelight Series

Our 418th Dad in the Limelight is David Kepley. I want to thank David for being a part of this series. It has been great getting connected with him and now sharing him with all of you.

 

David Kepley, Dads in the Limelight, #limelightdads, dad of divas, dadofdivas.com1)    Tell me about yourself, (as well as how you are in the limelight for my readers knowledge)

I am a stay-at-home dad and in my spare time I co-manage the Just a Dad 247 blog.  My hobbies are household projects and movies with explosions.  My favorite color is green and I’m confident that I am the most humble person you know.

 

2)    Tell me about your family

I have two boys (age 2 and 4) and a wife I could not be more proud of.  My wife is a flight attendant.  We met at 5 am on a train.  She was going to her first day at work and I was coming home from…well, drinking.  When my wife goes to work, she does not come home for a few days at a time.  That leaves me on my own with no relief coming.  The benefits outweigh the detriments and we do our best to make it work.

 

3)    What has been the largest challenge you have had in being a father?

Patience.  It is easy to get lost in my own selfishness and in turn take that out on my kids.  I believe understanding another person’s perspective is the key to being patient.  With them, I try to remember they are children and they are learning.

David Kepley, Dads in the Limelight, #limelightdads, dad of divas, dadofdivas.com

4)    What advice would you give to other fathers?

Do the best you can.  Realize that only you know what your best is.  Whether that means not getting everything on your to-do list done or allotting time to engage with your children; know your limitations while holding a high standard.

 

5)    How have you come to balance parenthood and outside life?

I put my marriage first above all things.  If my marriage is strong, everything else will trickle down.  Especially given our schedules, my wife and I make it a priority to make time together, not just as parents, but as the individuals who fell in love.

 

6)    What have you learned from the fathers that you have interacted with?

There are more dads who would be willing to be a stay-at-home parent than you would think.  Many families are hindered by their work schedules.  My wife has the ability to pick up more shifts to bridge the gap of two incomes.  Men are increasingly seeing the benefits through the opposition of societal and economic pressures.

David Kepley, Dads in the Limelight, #limelightdads, dad of divas, dadofdivas.com

7)    What else would you share regarding your experiences as a father thus far?

Try to avoid the comparison games that people place on their children.  So what if a book says they should know their ABC’s by twenty months.  Children are different, they are born that way.  I try to encourage my children’s strengths and guide them through their weaknesses.  Ultimately my goal is to prepare my children with the tools to get the most out of their lives.  I think they can only do that if they approach that as who they are and not who anyone thinks they should be.

 

8)    What have been the most memorable experiences that you have had thus far as a parent?

Hearing I love you from my children.  Not just the parroting statement that I try to get them to repeat, but the true conscious decision in their eyes when they say the words.  I have never heard anything better.

If you have any questions for David, please leave a comment here and I will make sure that he gets them so that he may be able to respond!

Also, do you know a Dad in the Limelight? If so, please email me their contact information so that they too can be a part of this series!

Dad of Divas, dadofdivas.com

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